4/14: annual path weeding

At the beginning of 2013, I undertook a large job up in the top tier of making some paths through the plum trees. To utilise the huge pile of mulch from the conifer lopping, I had to cut back a plethora of english ivy first.

A year later I have finished what I am now calling the annual path weed. Fortunately it did not take as much effort to refresh it as it did to create it, and being very thorough digging up the roots of the various weeds and ivy this time, the next annual weed should be much easier.

annual path weeding

Advertisements

51/52: red and green for the season

One little area that was overgrown with seaside daisies has had a re-vamp, just in time for Christmas. Erigeron is great for a cottage garden, spreading itself with wanton abandon. I have a number of plants in the garden that I am constantly trying to control.

Swaying between a casual, cottage garden and a more formal, trimmed and pruned look, I sometimes allow areas to become a little overgrown. Currently this garden bed has been allowed to go a little wild, and was more than ready for some timely revision.

overgrown with seaside daisiesWith that in mind, I dug up all the seaside daisies, Erigeron, and trimmed back the irises to little stalks, reminding myself to separate the bulbs and spread them across this garden bed next March, as two dozen in a clump is rather too much.

Meanwhile, I have planted mainly red bedding begonias , plus some Pratia, a small-leafed ground cover with tiny blue flowers. Hopefully this will eventually cover the entire area, and any Erigeron that sneaks through will be eradicated.

fitting for the seasonred and green makeover for ChristmasThe result is rather festive, just in time for Christmas, but will be lovely on a continuing basis, particularly when the ratio of plants to mulch is greater than at present.

43/52: more magnificent mauve

The glorious rhododendron is reaching the tail-end of its seasonal flowering. I can always rely on it commemorating my dear departed mother’s birthday each October, which is rather appropriate, because this plant was transplanted from my parents’ home in Mitcham many years ago.

a mass of mauvebeautiful at any anglea wall of colourblushing rhododendronmisty mauveoutside the bedroom windowThe colour can vary on a really sunny day, but these flowers are beautiful in any weather.

in bright sunlight

26/52: the scoria project

Having already used some of the scoria given to me by a friend, in the creation of the Mothers’ Day Memorial, I set to work to do another area. This time, it was the front edge adjacent to the footpath that needed attention. Because the mulch was being dug up, probably by birds, the scoria (over some cut-up Liquorland bags for weed prevention) has hopefully done the trick.

scoria, bricks and rocks edge the footpath succulent cutting amongst the scoriaIn amongst the scoria are tiny cuttings from the succulent that resides largely in the front garden, which should spread nicely within this area.

Resourceful recycling and minimal maintenance feature strongly in my garden.

 

 

25/52: pebble mix

On the second weekend in May, my husband helped create a Mothers’ Day Memorial garden for our dear departed mothers.

Now it is complete with a variety of pebbles.  The spaces created by the angle of the bricks were a very narrow triangle (actually an arc). With many of my creative projects I need to go through various ideas before I settle on the final implementation.

One of my ideas had been to plant some mini ground covers in some of the segments, or maybe a cottage garden effect with some alyssum, but in the end I thought that would require a lot more maintenance than simply filling the gaps with pebbles.

A friend was getting rid of some scoria, and since I already had the white and black pebbles, it ended up being one of my favourite things – a recycling project! There were two advantages to cutting up some polystyrene to use as a base for the stones: firstly, it saved filling the gaps completely with pebbles, and secondly it should deter weed growth.

polystyrene wedge

different colours and textures pebble mix pebble mixture  viewed from my bedroom windowNow the view from my bedroom window is complete.

24/52: a few of my favourite photos of my garden

Since it is a bleak June day, ceaselessly raining, what better way to brighten my mood than with some of my favourite garden photos?

marvellous marigolds fuchsia pensive Zorro cropped-a-bridge-too-far-as-seen-from-bottom-tier1.jpg lovely roses after the rain the cat sat on the mat Beautiful Babiana looking towards the middle tier cats wait patiently for a changeI can’t believe I managed to blog EVERY day last year; it was an all-consuming task. This year I am actually concentrating more on indoor renovations: painting, deaccumulating, rearranging, reorganising, which is quite therapeutic, but I know come springtime I will be raring to go outside in full force.

 

20/52: mothers’ day memorial garden

Although generally I am pretty good at grammar, I’m never sure whether to put the apostrophe before or after the “s” for this particular day, as it depends if you are talking singular or plural: Mother’s Day if you are only referring to your own mother, but Mothers’ Day for the general populous of female parents.

In this case I am going plural, as last weekend I enlisted my husband’s help to create a memorial garden bed for our mothers. Utilising bricks I had been given (hooray, finally finished clearing them off the path that had been their home for months), we, (meaning he: my design, his labour of love), made a circle for a cast iron birdbath to take pride of place in its centre.

Planning and preparing the area had to be done prior to the planting. My original plan of a three brick radius had to be modified to two, for the available space (and bricks).

initial planning

dig, level and measure

check levels

  ready for planting

hard at work on a labour of love

Then, five azaleas were placed around one side, making another attractive vista from our bedroom window. Three smaller Shirazz azaleas sit adjacent to the others.

Shirazz Azalea

The two white Aline azaleas, one in memory of my darling mother, Elaine, (d. 2001), and the other for my wonderful mother-in-law, (d. 2005), contrasting against the burgundy foliage of the Shirazz, should make a brilliant show in future years.

Aline Azalea

My own children were unavailable that weekend, with one holidaying in the USA and the other working in hospitality, but I know our ♥love♥ is strong. To compensate, I still had my furry boys Shadow and Zorro, and I so appreciate my husband’s labour of love on this project, so it was a lovely day, and a most fitting one to honour our mothers who brought us forth into life.

a fitting tribute to our mothers

P.S. As my own tribute, I decided to start another blog, based on families, relationships and human behaviour, which you can find at princesspoppsychology.wordpress.com.

18/52: pumpkin project bears fruit

Some time ago I did a little artificial insemination to ensure fertilisation of a female pumpkin flower. I am delighted to show you the fine result of my interference:

 lovely rogue pumpkin

Ta-daa!

Unfortunately, some of the pumpkin eggs I tried to fertilise just died off. I am calling them eggs as if they are not mated with a male, there will be no pumpkin.

It is now late autumn and as I was just about to harvest the one pumpkin from that massive vine, and pull out the rest of the plant, what did I spy? Amazingly, both a male and female flower sitting side by side, making googly eyes at each other. I introduced them, and before long they were coupling, with a little help from the Artificial Inseminator. It may well be too late in the season but it’s worth a try. Happy honeymoon!

female and male pumpkin flowers